Portfolio

Details

Category
Games
Course
CIS 3000: Intro to Game Design
Professor
Walker White
Semester
Spring 2011
URL
http://hugolemes.com/override

Introduction

As Lilith, you are the only crew of an automated cargo ship traversing the vacuum of space. One night you wake to a series of explosions rocking the ship. Not only is there major damage, but the automated repair systems are offline. The only way to save yourself and the ship is to journey through its twisted structures to perform repairs. Your only allies will be the ship's robots, as you initiate emergency overrides to control them.

Can you navigate chaos and restore order?

As you explore your surroundings, and search for the cause of the damage, another question will loom...are you really alone on the ship?

Note: Third Place Award at the GDIAC showcase!

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Artificer (Beta)

Details

Category
Games
Course
CIS 4999: Independent Research
Professor
Walker White
Date
Fall 2011

Introduction

You awaken in an unfinished high-tech city in the year 7033 C.E., in a five-district structure that has traveled for millennia from Orion in the direction of Pleiades. You learn that a mysterious race of beings left it unfinished, and that an equally mysterious power source keeps it half-alive, with just enough energy for its yet unknown purpose of existence to be finalized by someone in the future, or now, if you are up to the this most intriguing challenge.

You further learn that intelligent robots, fueled by a less powerful, but very dangerous, energy source, protect the city from any invaders: powerful antibodies trying to protect the megalithic living creature of light that the city, even though unfinished, has become.

Along your exploration through the five districts you encounter terminals waiting to be connected, complex circuits blocked by broken light paths, and intervening robots that can, after all, also help you revitalize the city. Are you ready to become an artificer and discover the ancient high-tech city's true purpose, or change it completely? The city's destiny is in your hands, or rather, at your agile fingertips!

Team Design: Hugo Lemes (Artist), Cooper Findley (Programmer), Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo (Musician)

First Place award at the GDIAC showcase!

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Augmenting Alchemy

Ronchamp and the Cornell Sculpture Garden

Details

Category
Games
Course
ARCH 5102: Thesis
Advisors
George Hascup
Amber Bartosh
Semester
Spring 2012

Introduction

With the popularization of powerful mobile devices, augmented reality applications are becoming more sophisticated, facilitating the blurring of the virtual and the real. The architectural potentials are limitless.

Concurrently, a resurgence in the interest for occult wisdom following a period of neglect because of the enlightenment age is evident. Le Corbusier intricately embedded esotericism in his post-war architecture, particularly at Ronchamp, which, according to Coombs, is an embodiment of the seven stages of alchemy. The aim of this thesis is to create an augmented environment on the Cornell Sculpture Garden, using augmented reality to virtualize ancient principles, such as the seven stages of alchemy, that have been normally found in the material world of books.

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Details

Category
Animations
Course
ARCH 4509: Cinematic Cities
Professor
John Zissovici
Semester
Fall 2010

Introduction

Project featuring Prypiat, one of the famous Soviet 'atom' cities that had to be evacuated because of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in 1986. It uses a combination of Google Earth features and short clips/images from appropriated media related to the city in order to create a hybrid cinematic experience involving the real and the virtual.

Music: Radioactivität by Kraftwerk

Team Design: Hugo Lemes and Woon Bae (Jackie)

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Machine Roof

Details

Category
Animations
Course
ARCH 3101: Comprehensive Design
Professor
George Hascup
Semester
Fall 2009

Introduction

Animation showing the mechanism of the solar panels throughout the year on top of a gymnasium designed for the city of Ithaca. Grasshopper was used in conjunction with Rhino for the animations, and solar data was obtained from Ecotect.

Music: Computer Love by Kraftwerk

Design Team: Jarman Acevedo, Hugo Lemes, Margaret Knight, Ryland Dandreta, Vincent Lim

Animation: Hugo Lemes

Details

Category
Animations
Course
ARCH 4102
Professors
John Zissovici, Peter Cook, Michael Webb, and Dennis Crompton
Semester
Spring 2011

Introduction

MTA FAR is an application that brings visual data pertaining to Prospect Park into the F-­line commute. Immerse yourself in either a left or right brain virtual tour that features items of interest revealing the character of the park. See media pertaining to flora, fauna, history and events occurring within the park presented either scientifically or artistically. Explore the park through various visuals while learning about local events, food, and other cultural aspects through the tweets you receive at the subway stations on your ride in the MTA F-­Line.

The two modes: left and right brained, can be switched at the arrival of a station, while the augmented data you collected is processed into a timeline. In the end, your ride will be condensed into an album that can be stored or discarded. This collection includes the local imagery pertaining to the park or to what people will be constantly uploading through the internet.

Also, the park is dynamic and constantly changing, and the tweets you receive in one station might manifest themselves at some point along your augmented ride through the park.

Team: Hugo Lemes and Victor Ramos

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MTA F-Line

Details

Category
Animations
Course
ARCH 4102
Professors
John Zissovici, Peter Cook, Michael Webb, and Dennis Crompton
Semester
Spring 2011

Introduction

The first animation shows urban blocks along MTA's F-Line near Prospect Park being exploded as a tourist travels from station to station. The amount of influence is determined by demographic data. In this case, the income, differentiated in different shades of green, is the determining additive factor.

The animation was done in Rhino through the Grasshopper plug-in. Other animations below show earlier experiments and views in the Q-line and elevational studies with gravity attractors.

Team: Hugo Lemes and Victor Ramos

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Miesian Transformation

Details

Category
Animations
Course
ARCH 2102
Professor
John Zissovici
Semester
Spring 2009

Introduction

A plan transformation of one of the courtyard houses by Mies into a 3D structure. The rules, heavily influenced by the Miesian grid, were created and manipulated as the transformation took place. This experiment was later expanded into a digital structure and a community, as listed under architectural projects.

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Milan Expo Pavilion

Details

Category
Animations
Course
ARCH 5101: Artificial Matters
Professors
Amber Bartosh and Elena Manferdini
Semester
Fall 2011

Introduction

This animation shows how this proposed pavilion for the Milan Expo 2015 cools and then heats up, mimicking the metal annealing process.

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Moon Colonizer

Details

Category
New Media
Course
ART 2704: Interactive Media
Professor
Stephanie Owens
Semester
Fall 2010
URL
http://hugolemes.com/moon

Introduction

The word 'colonization' still very much rings in the minds of earthlings as a cyclic enterprise beginning in recorded history with the Romans. The discovery of the New World and European colonization did not happen long ago, nationalistic economic expansion is still ongoing, and an invisible network of various powers is becoming more and more evident. Although colonization has traditionally meant the occupation and the subjugation of the existing culture to a colonial government, it does not necessarily require a formal political structure or living forms when one is inferring the dominion over an area devoid of political boundaries (such as we see currently with international crime organizations and drug cartels), or the control of another planetary body, such as the moon or a planet like Mars, where no life is to be found.

The Moon Colonizer takes advantage of Google Earth features, such as the moon, network links, dea model placement, and the screen's bounding box to create a dynamic user experience of 'material' colonization.

The user starts with an empty canvas, a crater, a post, and is offered several typologies and a few natural features (scaled up to factors ranging from 200 to 500) to begin the occupation. Building occurs as one pans over the moon, through the insertion of a model in the middle of the screen (the bounding box) every second. In the end, The Moon Colonizer is an interactive simulation intended to make one rethink the very notion of colonization, to begin visualizing a potential future occupation of the moon or other planetary bodies in the universe.

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Forking Paths

Details

Category
New Media
Course
ART 2704: Interactive Media
Professor
Stephanie Owens
Semester
Fall 2010
URL
http://hugolemes.com/forkingpaths

Introduction

Inspired by Borges' The Garden of Forking Paths, this project takes parts of the poem and reorganizes it through hyperlinks that interlink the categories within the site. Words or terms interelated lead to a common image given by Google search.

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Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite and .5 and .2 pens
Dimensions
20" x 28"
Date
2002-2003

Introduction

This drawing began as a highschool project on Romeo and Juliet, but was substituted for a smaller piece due to time constraints. However, about one year later I decided to finish this piece, and send it to the Boston Scholastics Art architectural drawing contest, where it was awarded honorable mention.

The scene is that famous one of Romeo and Tybalt having a duel. I changed things around a little and had plenty of freedom to play with architecture styles, particularly after the piece was not part of the school project any longer. I almost took the characters out: Romeo, Juliet, the Nurse, Tybalt and his cousin...but I was advised otherwise, and changed my mind, even though I still think they look gigantic in proportion to the buildings.

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The Take Over

Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Dimensions
8.5" x 11"
Date
2007

Introduction

The Take Over symbolizes and synthesizes many of the things I had been reading at this time. Mostly, it is about the take over of power through architecture, expressed through the politics and technology of an era. The sketches begin with the inclusion of skycrapers and then evolve, backwards in time, to a period where not capitalism, but the church, dominated. The masonic obelisk being next to the cathedral is symbolic of clashing philosophies in the 19th century.

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Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Dimensions
12" x 18"
Date
2001-2006

Introduction

This work was inspired after the legendary world of Agartha mentioned in a number of ancient texts, and myths passed through generations.

Agartha is found in the Epic of Gilgamesh - the oldest ancient text discovered, and is known around the world by different names:

Hindus call it Aryavartha, the Chinese know it as Hsi Tien, the Russian Old Believers named it Belovodye, and the Kirghiz people dubbed it Janaidar. It is also known in Sanskrit as Shambalah, or land of peace, of tranquility.

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Regnus Orianus

Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Dimensions
22" x 17"
Date
2010

Introduction

This work bridges two existing realities, one in the past and the other sometime in the future. Imhotep/Hermes Trismegistus, Isis, and Count Cagliostro are personified here in futuristic outfits.

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Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Competition
Splice Contest
Date
2010

Introduction

Titanio is a hybrid of a giant of Sardinia with a Native American Kachina fairy/spirit. Although the existence of these beings in the past is solely mythological, and is something debated amongst scholars, their presence in the myths of many cultures makes us wonder whether they have been purely fantastical in nature.

We find many variations of the giant myth, in Genesis, Nordic mythology, the Greek Titans, the Andean Viracocha, the Sardinian giant, Goliath, and even in Arthurian legend concerning Mt. Saint Michelle.

Variations of fairies also occur through many cultures. The Japanese Kodamas, the aborigine Wondjinas, and the Native American Kachinas are some examples.

Titanio is thus a hybrid of a giant and a fairy, friendly to humans, and a great builder. It is neither male nor female, is herbivore, and despite its weight, is able to fly like an ancient dragon.

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Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Dimensions
28"x20"
Date
2007

Introduction

The great Atlantis which Plato mentions and describes in his 'Timaeus and Critias' has led many to visualize it in various ways, write theories about its location, and others to question if it ever existed in the first place.

Inspired by Plato's great account, this piece is but a humble attempt to bring an ancient moment as a visual representation, from fictitious imaginings of great cataclysm that seems to have destroyed Atlantis.

In the foreground you see the statue of an Atlantean leader being destroyed by a terrible earthquake, and further away an obelisk (the ancient symbol of the rays of Ra, the sun God that was probably worshiped there under another name). Even further, on the base of what appears to be an arena for games, a mother and her son; the motherly figure who is not only trying to save her baby, but also her husband who, about to be crushed by marble shards and blocks, is defenseless, wondering if his time has come.

Even further a statue of a priest, or perhaps a God, is holding the spheres which materialize the duality and opposites which exist in everything, that very ancient concept which is the same as the Ying and Yang of the Chinese, the Virgin and her Black counterpart, Good and Evil...

In the background the village being destroyed by the cataclysm, and a pyramid as an example of sacred geometry to please the Gods, and maybe serve this civilization for a greater purpose after death, is stilll majestically standing.

The skies are dark, ominous, and yet there is a light, or more for those who can find it. Where is the light?

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Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Dimensions
8.5"x11"
Date
2002

Introduction

Drawing in which I first tried to implement some gothic elements I had absorbed from looking at cathedrals.

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Port Richmond

Details

Category
Drawings
Course
ARCH 4101
Professors
Val Warke, Francesco Isidori, and Claudia Clemente
Semester
Fall 2010

Introduction

Sketch of Port Richmond in Philadelphia showing a possible intervention that takes advantage of the current site conditions and ruins. This area was historically used as a coal port in the 19th century, and also as a ship-building center during World War I.

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District of Lux

Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite and pens
Dimensions
18"x12"
Date
2004

Introduction

This is a conceptual district of an imaginary city called Orion, composed of arcologies that are linked through mag-lev tunnels.

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Rise of Orion

Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite
Dimensions
28"x20"
Date
2007

Introduction

The future will see the new world emerge from the rise of Orion. Conceptual in nature, this could be a representation of the first successful Arcology. Structures reaching for the stratosphere, defying the winds and all other forces of nature, standing together, integrated with their surroundings, as true living entities, capable of producing, breathing, taking care of themselves, the environment around them, and of their inhabitants in almost symbiotic relationships, where all are able to benefit. This reflects a time dominated by the wonders of nanotechnology, the mastery of biomimicry, the achievement of a world in which science begins performing true 'miracles', where man will discover himself, at last; where an utopia or paradise is perhaps to be finally found.

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Details

Category
Drawings
Media
Graphite and pen
Dimensions
11"x8.5"
Date
2006

Introduction

Imaginary city from the top down.

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Island of Projections

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 1101
Professors
Val Warke and Mark Morris
Date
Fall 2007

Introduction

The island, based on Prospero's A Harsh Book of Geometry, and intended for a writer, was designed through projections that simulate the three-dimensional pop-up feature of the famous book mentioned in the Shakesperean play The Tempest. Here artificial and natural vanishing points are played with, as well as enclosed paths and spaces that create an increased sense of projection through the shortening and broadening of walkways, and the height changes of walls.

Although this projective geometry is more developed horizontally, it is also vertically experimented with in the water tower.

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Arcological Suburbia

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 2102
Professor
John Zissovici
Date
Spring 2009

Introduction

As a counter-thesis to the typical Mies Courtyard House, this design experiment started with the transformation and densification of a Mies Courtyard plan (1 /16" = 1'-0") xeroxed onto a 11"x17" piece of paper. This was accomplished through techniques such as folding, scaling, interlocking to produce spacial interpenetration, rotation, and mirroring. The manipulation of the plan happened in a scale 1/2 the original, and ideas borrowed from Arcology were implemented throughout the processes of transformation and translation. Arcological principles applied included miniaturization and verticalization; the interconnection of residential, commercial, and service spaces; the integration of horticulture and agriculture; and, indirectly,Teilhard's Omega Point as an inspirational device.

Modular units that resulted from these processes became part of a field, which was further developed into a community setting that tries to bring people together in a vertical city, provide the most basic necessities of life in the most expedient form, and above all, establish a new order of living in a suburb.

Link to animation of folding process:

Miesian Transformation

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Exploring Variations with Virtual Light

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 2503: Drawing III
Professor
Yanni Loukissas
Date
Spring 2009

Introduction

Experiments with light using Mel'nikov's house as a base, and Rhino and Grasshopper as tools in the process. Here the opening and louvres are oriented and move according to the sunpath.

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Parametric Experiments

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 3102
Professor
Kevin Pratt
Date
Spring 2010

Introduction

Grasshopper experiments that preceeded a building program for Morningside Heights in NYC. Here I take a soursop and derive a parametric design using the Fibonacci sequence, among other parameters allowed in Grasshopper. Then another design is achieved by manipulating the first Grasshopper definition.

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Metropolitan Insertions

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 3102: Metropolitan Insertions
Professor
Kevin Pratt
Date
Spring 2010

Introduction

A building program for Morningside Heights in NYC is proposed as an extension program for Columbia University: a mini-campus within the park, containing educational and recreational programs both for the school and for the adjacent community of Harlem. The design, parametrically designed in Grasshopper, takes its inspiration from previous experiments involving natural objects.

Group Design: Hugo Lemes and Christine Kim

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Artificial Matters

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 5101: Artificial Matters
Professors
Amber Bartosh and Elena Manferdini
Date
Fall 2011

Introduction

The boundaries between the natural and artificial are becoming blurred, and works of art and architecture demonstrate such state. David Mach, for example, is able to create stunning organic sculptures using hangers, and architects like Herzog & de Meuron push the boundaries of what conventional materials can achieve through light and other media. It is the relationship between the natural and artificial that this project plays with both on the landscape and in the building.

On the landscape, this is expressed through the coexistence of a metallic perforated version of the asparagus and the natural vegetation. In the building, this condition happens through the inside and outside states of the skin. While the exterior is a rough metallic skin, the interior is a natural indicator of heat temperature through colors and light, mimicking the process of annealing or heat treatment.

Color emissivity can be controlled inside the building, giving the impression, from the outside, that the entire massing is being heated or cooled. This is possible because of the various perforations on the skin, some which connect the inside and outside.

The experience both of the landscape and the building is intended to heighten one's awareness of artificial and natural conditions and processes, in order that one may be able to imagine a near future where perhaps the real and the artificial, and even the virtual, will synthesize into one reality, or technological singularity. Here thus is a case study, a proposition of such future: The coldness of a metallic, partly melted landscape superimposed by unexpected lush vegetation as the site of a metallic structure in constant chemical reaction, heating and cooling, emitting light, welcoming and surprising the visitors to the Milan exposition.

Country: Argentina, one of the greatest producers of asparagus.

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Borderline Metropolis: Port Richmond

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 4101: Borderline Metropolis
Professors
Val Warke, Francesco Isidori, and Claudia Clemente
Date
Fall 2010

Introduction

This Philadelphia-based studio served as a starting point for investigating Philadelphia's historic railroads, as well as Port Richmond, historically known for its prosperous industrial past, and also its current decadence. My proposal is for a complete upgrade of the dock area, which used to be great a coal loading location in the 19th century, and a ship-building center during world war I. It is almost an utopian attempt to offer the community around it recreational opportunities difficult or impossible to reach: a glimpse of 'paradise' that hopes to rejuvenate not only the spirits of the people who live in the neighborhood, but also to attract new business ventures.

The Following link offers an historical interactive timeline of Philadelphia's railroad history within Google Earth:

Philadelphia's Rail History

Group Design: Hugo Lemes, Viet Nguyen, and Lisa Nesterova

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The Grotto

Details

Category
Architectural
Course
ARCH 3101: Comprehensive Design
Professor
George Hascup
Date
Fall 2009

Introduction

The Grotto, as an intervention for the city of Ithaca, attempts to bridge Seneca and Buffalo streets through a diagonal promenade, facilitating the flow of pedestrians moving from buildings such as the Clinton House to the northwest. The building treats the gymnasium as a sacred space, and associates the showers (the main sources of water here)– with the grotto – which is a natural or artificial cave often found or built near water, and a feature of many old cathedrals of Europe. Chartres Cathedral, for example, was constructed over a pre-existing druidic grotto or shrine. This move to make an underground grotto was an attempt to respond to the three churches around the block, as well as to the Masonic temple across the Clinton House.

Programmatically, then, while the entrance hall, multipurpose room, and restrooms are located on the ground floor, where most light is, all other programs, including the gymnasium space, the lockers and showers, the mechanical and equipment rooms, are sunken underground. The lockers and showers are sunken even more, in order to accentuate the experience of going down to the grotto.

Structurally, the building consists of wood timber columns that support a wood space frame – from which the curtain walls are allowed to hang from without considerable foundation.

There are two major systems in the building. One deals with water collection and use of brown water in toilet flushing, etc. The water is collected from the slanting roofs, taken inside the main envelope in a diagonal reservoir (where it is mixed with regular water) exposed to the internal air where it is naturally heated, and then taken to the basement level – where the showers are.

Another system is the natural ventilation, where cold wind is introduced from below through mechanized openings. When heated, this air rises, bringing in even more cold air from below. There are also vents on the roof that allow predominantly higher winds from the southwest to permeate the building. This system is critical during the summer, when temperatures can become unbearable because of the greenhouse effect that comes with the building's glazed curtain walls.

The greenhouse effect plays an important role in heating up the building during winter. This is possible because of the glazed surfaces and the skylights facing south. A subsystem of this is the grotto's entrance, which plays a significant role in balancing humidity from the showers with the outside through homeostasis.

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About Me

Introduction

I'm Hugo Lemes. I lived half of my life in Brazil and half in the United States, always considering myself more as a citizen of the world. Although most of the work on this website is academic, you will also find that my most personal interests are partly expressed through drawings and papers I have written. Besides my interest in architecture and game design, I am also deeply interested in metaphysical, esoteric research going back to ancient civilizations.

My fascination for game design has always been alive through my imagination of worlds nearly impossible to be built: shapes and landscapes that have always formed in my mind since childhood. At the age 9 I decided to teach myself perspectival drawing in a blackboard in a room in the back of my house, after watching a televised high school course called "Telecurso 2000" on the physics of the universe and black holes. I still remember the vanishing points and the grid which inspired me. From that point on I began drawing extensively in 3D, and imagining more and more complex environments.

University allowed me to understand why we make certain design choices based on the modernist legacy, and also how it is possible to constantly change the status quo through technology. The possibilities of the virtual, New Media participation, augmented reality, and historical and esoteric didactic content as in games like the Assassin's Creed series, have always inspired me.

While at Cornell I had a chance not only to learn from a challenging architecture program, but also opportunities to meet people in other departments, including Art, Computer Science, and Material Science, that have greatly fueled my curiosity to learn beyond what I was expected as an architecture student.

Having worked in four games, two for the National Science Foundation, and two award winning projects for the GDIAC (Override and Artificer), has not only made me realize how game design rewardingly allows for my imagination to come alive interactively for other people to experience, but also revealed to me another level of collaboration that I did not know could take place in a creative field with so many professionals: musicians, programmers, developers, artists, animators, etc.

Hugo Lemes
B.ARCH 2012
AAP Cornell University

My Skills

Photoshop
90
Rhino + GH
90
Illustrator
85
Autocad
95
Maya
75
Z-Brush
80
Final Cut
85
Ecotect
85
Global Mapper
90
KML
80
Flash
70
Objective C
65

Contact Me

Contact Information

Phone
617-960-7504

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